Thursday, August 1, 2019

Greenville Midwifery - A natural home birth in Greenville SC might be for you

Greenville Midwifery - A natural home birth in Greenville SC might be for you

Greenville Midwifery - A natural home birth in Greenville SC might be for you



Greenville Midwifery - A natural home birth in Greenville SC might be for you

Are you interested in delivering your child at home with a midwife in Greenville SC?

Greenville Midwives Home Birth Options

Are you looking for more information about using a midwife for your natural home birth in Greenville SC?

Labors of Love Midwifery

1622 East North Street, Suite #8A
Greenville, SC 29607 864-285-0574

See All Our Google Reviews

Greenville Midwives Home Birth

Labors of Love Midwifery serves the upstate of SC, providing families alternative midwifery care throughout the childbearing years. You may prefer to provide in the house or in our birth facility under the proficient care of our Licensed Midwives and also Certified Professional Midwives. Our knowledgeable Midwifes have dealt with females living throughout the Upstate of SC consisting of in Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Greenwood, Clinton/laurens, and also Charlotte NC as well as have created an extremely welcoming and a setting for all females seeking healthcare for pregnancy and also past. We are committed to offering care that is considerate, informative and family-centered. We support females to accept childbirth as a typical experience that they are flawlessly made for so that infants could be birthed into a nurtured location loaded with love.

A home birth might be for you.

If you're weighing your delivery options and do not desire the medical atmosphere of a healthcare facility however likewise aren't interested in providing in the house, a birthing center may be the best choice for you. With expert staff, very little medical disturbances and cozy accommodations, a birthing center is the very best of both worlds for numerous females. To assist you choose whether it's ideal for you, here's whatever you require to understand about delivering at a birthing center.

What a home birth is

A birthing center is a homey, low-tech birth choice for moms-to-be who prefer a natural childbirth experience. Normally, birth centers are freestanding centers, but in some cases they're adjacent to or inside a healthcare facility In the majority of birthing centers, midwives (and not OB-GYNs) are the primary care providers. Besides offering a comfy place to deliver your child, birth centers provide numerous services consisting of well-woman examinations, prejudgment therapy, prenatal care, childbirth education, breastfeeding classes, postpartum care and assistance and post-baby birth control.

How it's various from a medical facility.

At home birth care is normally led by licensed midwives, though many midwives may work in cooperation with OB-GYNs, pediatricians and other healthcare experts-- meaning they consult them if the need arises. But delivering at home and delivering at a hospital vary in a number of ways. While a labor space in a hospital looks like, well, a space in a health center, you are in control of the birthing space in your home , to make it as conforntable as you desire. And treatments that are basic or a minimum of common in a medical facility setting (such as continuous fetal monitoring, regular IVs and induction of labor) aren't routine with a midwife during your home birth.

The advantages of a home birth

You are in complete control. Home birth typically have soft lighting, your own bed (which implies your partner can snuggle with you, if you're up for it), your midwife can bring a birthing tub. Some families are like to have burning candles or special music to help them relax into labor paterns. Greater personal privacy in your home -- whereas at a hospital, unless your insurance covers a personal room (lots of don't), you'll be moved to a semi-private space after delivery. More liberty in your home. You can walk and be as active as you like, wear what you desire, and give birth in whatever position feels most comfy. You even get to eat a snack or snack and beverage during and after labor (no food or beverages throughout the pushing phase though). At a healthcare facility, on the other hand, all food and fluids (except for ice chips) are normally a no-go, your motions will probably be limited (considering that there is normally continuous electronic fetal tracking), and you'll likely need to give birth pushing on your back on the bed. Also, in a healthcare facility delivery, your baby will be taken to a various space for his/her very first checkup, and a few times more for other treatments. At a home birth, however, unless the baby needs emergency care, your baby will not be whisked off to another space after the birth (and family and friends will not be sent away either-- unless you desire them to be). Whatever-- from preventative care like the vitamin K shot to child's first bath and examination-- happens in the exact same room. Because fewer medications and medical interventions are included, healing time is much shorter than at a hospital. With the majority of families the midwife will leave in 2 to 4 hours after the birth, compared to you being 24 to 48 hours at a health center. Decreased danger of a C-section. The rate of C-sections for ladies who chose a home birth to deliver is around 6% (compared to just under 26% for comparable low-risk ladies in healthcare facilities). No epidural. Midwives do not offer epidurals at home. Instead, they rely on alternative discomfort relief choices, such as hydrotherapy, breathing exercises, massage and acupuncture. The downsides of delivering at home with a midwife are the lack of midwives in certain areas. Possible transfer to a health center. If there is an issue or emergency situation, you'll be moved to a health center. Thankfully, less than 2 percent of transfers are because of emergencies (they're primarily due to mother having an incredibly tough labor and/or requests for an epidural.) However midwives do carry, oxygen and baby resuscitators for use throughout the transfer procedure. No insurance coverage. Some insurance provider don't cover home births with a midwife. Contact your insurance provider to discuss your protection. When you can't deliver at a at home with a midwife. Midwives manage just low-risk pregnancies. If you have hypertension, diabetes or gestational diabetes, your child is in the breech position, you're pregnant with multiples, or you have other issues that might cause problems, a home birth isn't the right option for you.

Who can attend my home birth

It's completely approximately you to decide who and how many people will be present throughout labor and delivery. Unlike the medical facility experience, you're not limited to a particular number (and kids won't get the automated boot when it's time for you to push). Naturally, that does not indicate you must attempt to pack 30 people in the space! Natural birth supporters frequently recommend restricting the variety of people who are present, as having too many individuals around can be an interruption and make labor take longer. Remember, those who miss the live event can capture the replay through photos or video recordings, which are welcome by midwives at home births.

How much it costs for a home birth

The cost varies depending upon where you live and the midwife you choose. In general, prenatal care and delivery at a home with a midwife will be around $3,000 to $4,000 (normally much less than the grand overall for a medical facility birth). Once again, talk to your insurance provider to identify coverage and out-of-pocket costs.

When to find your midwife

Midwives aren't able to deal with as many home births as a medical facility-- which suggests you ought to reserve your spot as early as possible (as soon as you identify you wish to deliver at a home-- the first trimester isn't prematurely). Know: Some medical facilities call their labor and delivery department a "birth center." So just because "birth center" is in a place's name does not always suggest it focuses on the homier, midwife-led childbirth experience. Visit the Commission for the Accreditation of Birthing Centers' site to find a center near you. As soon as you've discovered one, you can set up to visit it. You'll have the ability to discover more about the center, fulfill the staff, and find out what you can do to prepare for the terrific experience that's quickly to come.

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Greenville Midwifery - Looking for natural home birth in Greenville SC

Greenville Midwifery - Looking for natural home birth in Greenville SC

Greenville Midwifery - Looking for natural home birth in Greenville SC



Greenville Midwifery - Looking for natural home birth in Greenville SC

Are you interested in delivering your child at home with a midwife in Greenville SC?

Greenville Midwives Home Birth Options

Are you looking for more information about using a midwife for your natural home birth in Greenville SC?

Labors of Love Midwifery

1622 East North Street, Suite #8A
Greenville, SC 29607 864-285-0574

See All Our Google Reviews

Greenville Midwives Home Birth

Labors of Love Midwifery serves the upstate of SC, providing families alternative midwifery care throughout the childbearing years. You may prefer to provide in the house or in our birth facility under the proficient care of our Licensed Midwives and also Certified Professional Midwives. Our knowledgeable Midwifes have dealt with females living throughout the Upstate of SC consisting of in Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Greenwood, Clinton/laurens, and also Charlotte NC as well as have created an extremely welcoming and a setting for all females seeking healthcare for pregnancy and also past. We are committed to offering care that is considerate, informative and family-centered. We support females to accept childbirth as a typical experience that they are flawlessly made for so that infants could be birthed into a nurtured location loaded with love.

A home birth might be for you.

If you're weighing your delivery options and do not desire the medical atmosphere of a healthcare facility however likewise aren't interested in providing in the house, a birthing center may be the best choice for you. With expert staff, very little medical disturbances and cozy accommodations, a birthing center is the very best of both worlds for numerous females. To assist you choose whether it's ideal for you, here's whatever you require to understand about delivering at a birthing center.

What a home birth is

A birthing center is a homey, low-tech birth choice for moms-to-be who prefer a natural childbirth experience. Normally, birth centers are freestanding centers, but in some cases they're adjacent to or inside a healthcare facility In the majority of birthing centers, midwives (and not OB-GYNs) are the primary care providers. Besides offering a comfy place to deliver your child, birth centers provide numerous services consisting of well-woman examinations, prejudgment therapy, prenatal care, childbirth education, breastfeeding classes, postpartum care and assistance and post-baby birth control.

How it's various from a medical facility.

At home birth care is normally led by licensed midwives, though many midwives may work in cooperation with OB-GYNs, pediatricians and other healthcare experts-- meaning they consult them if the need arises. But delivering at home and delivering at a hospital vary in a number of ways. While a labor space in a hospital looks like, well, a space in a health center, you are in control of the birthing space in your home , to make it as conforntable as you desire. And treatments that are basic or a minimum of common in a medical facility setting (such as continuous fetal monitoring, regular IVs and induction of labor) aren't routine with a midwife during your home birth.

The advantages of a home birth

You are in complete control. Home birth typically have soft lighting, your own bed (which implies your partner can snuggle with you, if you're up for it), your midwife can bring a birthing tub. Some families are like to have burning candles or special music to help them relax into labor paterns. Greater personal privacy in your home -- whereas at a hospital, unless your insurance covers a personal room (lots of don't), you'll be moved to a semi-private space after delivery. More liberty in your home. You can walk and be as active as you like, wear what you desire, and give birth in whatever position feels most comfy. You even get to eat a snack or snack and beverage during and after labor (no food or beverages throughout the pushing phase though). At a healthcare facility, on the other hand, all food and fluids (except for ice chips) are normally a no-go, your motions will probably be limited (considering that there is normally continuous electronic fetal tracking), and you'll likely need to give birth pushing on your back on the bed. Also, in a healthcare facility delivery, your baby will be taken to a various space for his/her very first checkup, and a few times more for other treatments. At a home birth, however, unless the baby needs emergency care, your baby will not be whisked off to another space after the birth (and family and friends will not be sent away either-- unless you desire them to be). Whatever-- from preventative care like the vitamin K shot to child's first bath and examination-- happens in the exact same room. Because fewer medications and medical interventions are included, healing time is much shorter than at a hospital. With the majority of families the midwife will leave in 2 to 4 hours after the birth, compared to you being 24 to 48 hours at a health center. Decreased danger of a C-section. The rate of C-sections for ladies who chose a home birth to deliver is around 6% (compared to just under 26% for comparable low-risk ladies in healthcare facilities). No epidural. Midwives do not offer epidurals at home. Instead, they rely on alternative discomfort relief choices, such as hydrotherapy, breathing exercises, massage and acupuncture. The downsides of delivering at home with a midwife are the lack of midwives in certain areas. Possible transfer to a health center. If there is an issue or emergency situation, you'll be moved to a health center. Thankfully, less than 2 percent of transfers are because of emergencies (they're primarily due to mother having an incredibly tough labor and/or requests for an epidural.) However midwives do carry, oxygen and baby resuscitators for use throughout the transfer procedure. No insurance coverage. Some insurance provider don't cover home births with a midwife. Contact your insurance provider to discuss your protection. When you can't deliver at a at home with a midwife. Midwives manage just low-risk pregnancies. If you have hypertension, diabetes or gestational diabetes, your child is in the breech position, you're pregnant with multiples, or you have other issues that might cause problems, a home birth isn't the right option for you.

Who can attend my home birth

It's completely approximately you to decide who and how many people will be present throughout labor and delivery. Unlike the medical facility experience, you're not limited to a particular number (and kids won't get the automated boot when it's time for you to push). Naturally, that does not indicate you must attempt to pack 30 people in the space! Natural birth supporters frequently recommend restricting the variety of people who are present, as having too many individuals around can be an interruption and make labor take longer. Remember, those who miss the live event can capture the replay through photos or video recordings, which are welcome by midwives at home births.

How much it costs for a home birth

The cost varies depending upon where you live and the midwife you choose. In general, prenatal care and delivery at a home with a midwife will be around $3,000 to $4,000 (normally much less than the grand overall for a medical facility birth). Once again, talk to your insurance provider to identify coverage and out-of-pocket costs.

When to find your midwife

Midwives aren't able to deal with as many home births as a medical facility-- which suggests you ought to reserve your spot as early as possible (as soon as you identify you wish to deliver at a home-- the first trimester isn't prematurely). Know: Some medical facilities call their labor and delivery department a "birth center." So just because "birth center" is in a place's name does not always suggest it focuses on the homier, midwife-led childbirth experience. Visit the Commission for the Accreditation of Birthing Centers' site to find a center near you. As soon as you've discovered one, you can set up to visit it. You'll have the ability to discover more about the center, fulfill the staff, and find out what you can do to prepare for the terrific experience that's quickly to come.

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Friday, November 9, 2018

The Best Pregnancy Advice For Future Moms!

The Best Pregnancy Advice For Future Moms!

Congratulations! Now that you have found out you are expecting a little bundle of joy, you may have a lot of questions about what the next nine months will hold for you. While pregnancy is a great experience, there are some tips and tricks to getting through it that we want to share here with you.

Use a cold-water bath for swollen feet. One highly common symptom of pregnancy is swollen feet and ankles, especially in the heat. A cold water bath can reduce the blood flow to your feet, which in turn will reduce the inflammation. It also cools you down and gives you an excuse to be off your feet for a few minutes.

Regular exercise is essential when you are pregnant. This will decrease your chances of suffering a miscarriage, reduce the amount of time you are in labor, and it will make it easier to go back to your regular size, after you give birth.

Increase your intake of cereals, asparagus, lentils, oranges and orange juice. These foods are all rich in folic acid, which helps the development of the baby's neural cord and creates red blood cells for your unborn child. It is ideal to begin consuming these foods even before you start trying to conceive.

Keep exercising, even after your pregnancy is over and you have your baby. Pay attention to how you feel and take it slow, but keep active as much as you can. Staying fit after birth, will help you to recover faster from the effects of the pregnancy and labor.

Keep a journal during pregnancy, and fill it with stories and pictures from your pregnancy. Once your child grows up a little, they will appreciate the effort that you put into this! Seeing pictures of how their mom looked like while she was pregnant is something children love. Take a lot of pictures during each stage of pregnancy, and write down your thoughts into a journal that you can share with them later.

Talk to your family or friends who have already given birth. Obtaining advice from a person who has already been pregnant is vital, because she will be experienced in the matter and can help advise you.

Make sure you take time for yourself. After you deliver your baby, your life is going to be far more complex than now, and you won't have as much time to pamper yourself. Watch some anime, go out to the pub with friends, or just have fun doing whatever you like to do. You'll feel better, which means your baby will too.

One of the best ways to find relief in the late stages of pregnancy is by going swimming. You can just soak in your pool or you can even consider a water aerobics class. It will relieve many of the aches and pains that you are experiencing and it will make you feel weightless which can really help your ankles and feet.

Signing up early for your childbirth class can prevent the disappointment of not getting the dates and times that you want. While the birth of your baby may seem a long way away, it is never too early to find the classes you want and make your reservation with the providers.

Attend a breastfeeding class during pregnancy to learn the basics of nursing. These classes prepare you for the experience of breastfeeding your baby, and may provide tips for dealing with commonly encountered issues. You can also find out about resources for breastfeeding support in your community, such as local La Leche League chapters and meetings.

Keep away from alcohol when pregnant. When a woman drinks during her pregnancy, the alcohol will pass through her placenta directly to her unborn fetus. The best advice for women trying for a pregnancy and those who are pregnant is to stop drinking alcohol. Alcohol consumption when you are pregnant can result in miscarriage or pre-term labor, and it can also result in birth defects for your baby.

When comparing your pregnancy to those of your friends or even your own previous pregnancies, remember that each one is different. Each pregnancy can vary from the amount of weight you gain to the rate at which your belly grows. Also, the presence or absence of certain symptoms does not necessarily mean that something is wrong.

Find out what blood type you and your partner have. If you have incompatible blood types, there is a possibility that you could also be incompatible with your baby's blood type. This can lead to a condition called anemia, which causes complications during the pregnancy and birth of your child.

You can learn a great deal during your pregnancy to prepare for the birth of your child by reading about the birth experiences of others. Reading the stories that others share, and watching videos that they have posted online can give you valuable information about the wonders of birth, as well as the challenges.

Midwife

Do not skip your prenatal appointments. Every appointment that you have is a chance for your doctor or midwife to identify any issues while it is early enough to do something about it. Make your appointments your highest priority and do not allow anything to make you skip them.

Once you find out that you are pregnant, make sure that you find a doctor or midwife that you are comfortable with. Many times, women choose the first doctor that they see and end up having an unpleasant experience with them. Ask friends and family if they know of a good, reliable midwife.

Do not hesitate to inform your obstetrician or midwife if you experience depression during pregnancy. There are antidepressants that are considered safe for pregnant and nursing mothers, and in many cases, the benefits of taking them outweigh the risks of letting your depression go untreated. You do not have to suffer, and you are doing a great thing for both your baby and yourself by speaking up and getting help.

Having a baby is an unimaginable joy. The pregnant part is sometimes not so joyful. Lots of uncomfortable days and nights can make for a testy experience. If you remember what you read here though you can sail through it much easier and get on to the good part of being a mommy.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

What Makes A Good Birth Story?

I love reading birth stories. I love hearing how empowered women become after going through the act of giving birth. The victory they have achieved allows them to know they can do anything.

Some birth stories tell of endless hours of labors and triumph of delivery.
These are the stories where the mother has a very long prodromal or latent stage with contractions spaced out just far enough to keep her from sleeping well but not close enough together to be effective for dilation. She may speak of the people supporting her, bringing in food for her family, helping take care of other children, rubbing her back and wiping her brow.

Some birth stories are of fast and furious labors where the mom barely makes it to the birth center or hospital or the midwives barely make it to her home...or not. These stories often tell of a frantic husband who is relieved to turn the responsibility over to the care provider and take a moment to breathe for himself. She is often shocked and bewildered that it is all over.

And then there is everything in between. Fast labors, textbook labors, sorrowful labors, joyous labors.

What makes a good birth story? The ones that are told. Women need to tell their stories and they need to be heard. Women are resilient. They can handle the good, the bad and the ugly. They can effect change when their expectations are not met. They can make the world a better place for their daughters, daughter in laws and grand daughters to give birth.

Tell your story. Allow others to learn. Help us as caregivers to learn what was important to you.


Tuesday, January 20, 2015

5 Easy Steps to Bonding



The wait is finally over; your new baby is going to arrive today. You have done everything in your power to have a healthy pregnancy and birth. You want to be the best mom for your precious gift.

A crucial part of this is bonding.

Bonding is the connection between the newborn and family or other humans. Babies who bond well are happier, healthier and better adjusted.

5 Easy Steps to Bonding

1. Skin to skin contact: Immediately after the birth, your newborn should be placed in your arms. This contact allows you to groom and clean your baby. You gently touch, explore, massage, and smell your newborn. This act allows you to release a chemical in your brain called oxytocin also known as the “love” hormone. You fall in love with your baby and your baby falls in love with you.

2. Eye contact: You baby will be alert and awake the first hour after birth. Your baby’s eyes will be searching for yours. Your baby knows you. He has heard your voice, your heartbeat and felt your rhythms. Now he is ready to see you. This contact allows new pathways to form in his brain that will impact him for a lifetime.

3. Talk to your baby: You baby knows your voice. Hearing it brings calmness to his world. Birth is a difficult event for your baby. Your voice brings back normalcy. Sing to your baby if that is what you have done during your pregnancy. The human voice is powerful. Let your baby hear YOUR voice first and above all others in the room.

4. Listen to your maternal voice: During your pregnancy you have bonded with your baby. Your nurturing brain has changed and grown. You know how to care for your new baby. Listen. Your brain will tell you what to do. No website, magazine article or book can replace your maternal instinct. Love your baby and trust yourself.

5. Spend time with your new baby: Don’t allow your baby to be separated from you. Often babies are taken away for baths, screenings and evaluation. Ask that these procedures be done in your room. Ask for rooming in, so that your baby is not taken to a nursery. This allows you to get to know your babies needs so that you can be responsive without relying on someone else to make that observation and then respond.


Under the Old Tin Roof: Make My Blog Pretty

Under the Old Tin Roof: Make My Blog Pretty

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

What Happened to the Contractions

It happens frequently, contractions are strong and regular. You are coping with them well but you know if you are going to make it to the hospital, you need to leave now. You get in the car, the excitement building and begin your journey to your new life. Your life with a new baby.


You arrive at the hospital, you are questioned, examined, asked to sign a stack of papers, put on monitors and finally settled nicely into your bed to labor. But oddly enough your contractions have spaced out and not as intense. What happened to the contractions. The contractions that you were so excited to be having. The contractions that were going to bring your baby.

This is an all to common scenario. How it is handled can be the difference between a natural birth and a c-section.


Let's address first what happened.  Oxytocin is the  hormone released by the brain to cause contractions. The more oxytocin, the more contractions which will eventually bring baby to delivery. Oxytocin has some natural inhibitors-stress, observation, cold, speech, and bright lights. Michel Odent has taught this concept for years and has written several books on the subject. So when one arrives at the hospital with all the excitement, questions, bright lights, people talking and having to think and making decisions, the oxytocin level can drop drastically. When the oxytocin drops, contractions slow or even stop. Usually in time, if the stressors are removed, the oxytocin returns and labor will intensify. This may take a few hours or days.



I recently attended a hospital birth and got to see this event first hand. It was very dramatic. Contractions had been strong and 3 minutes apart. Everything slowed to the point that the mom was working diligently just to keep contractions going. After 10 hours of latent labor with no change, the wonderful OB we were working with suggested everyone go home. Once back home, contractions picked back up and once back at the hospital, labor was advanced enough that all the distractions were ignored and this mom reached complete.



The next slow down happened during pushing. The mom had been laboring in the tub, the lights were low, there was no talking, the water was warm and she gently moved her baby down behind a bulging bag of waters. She had to be moved to the bed for delivery, all the staff comes in for the big event, the lights are turned on so the scene can be visualized. Legs are spread, perineum is exposed and all stand expectantly waiting for the big event. This mom pushed her babies head out as instructed and then contractions stalled again. Of course this created quite a panic. The OB even commented that the one contraction that was bringing the body just quit. Go with me just for a moment  What would happen if you were in the middle of lovemaking ( the other time in our life when we produce a lot of oxytocin) and six strangers walked in to your room and started observing you and cheering you on? 


All ended well, but it was a  great illustration reminding me of how important it is to be vigilant in our preparation of the environment we invite women to give birth in.



As a guardian of the natural process of birth, I want to always  honor and respect the God's design  and not interfere in such a way that will inhibit labor or birth.